Useful Tips

How to record what is happening on the Mac screen with sound

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Making a video of what is happening on Mac’s screen is almost as easy as taking a screenshot. To do this, as part of OS X and a suitable program is available - QuickTime Player. True, there is one catch: the sounds that the applications make during recording will not be recorded - you will only have a picture in the captured file. The blooper is very annoying, but easy to fix.

This is the second time Apple has surprised me with a strange limitation in its software. You can, of course, take a third-party “screencast scribble”, but personally I prefer to squeeze the maximum out of the regular software. You can add a sound recording to QuickTime Player in just four easy steps.

2. Redirect sound from audio output to Soundflower

Open System Preferences and go to the module Sound. Tab Output instead of port Headphones select Soundflower (2ch). Actually, this is enough for QuickTime Player to record a video screencast with sound.

There is one more big but: now no sound will be heard during recording. .) Fortunately, and this is fixable.

3. Turn on the sound to control while recording

Launch the Soundflowerbed utility through Launchpad (it was installed along with Soundflower) - in the menu bar, next to the clock, you will see the icon of an eight-leaf flower. Click on this icon, and in the first section of the menu that appears, under Soundflower (2ch), select the command Built-in output.

4. Configure screen recording options

The system is ready, now it remains only to deal with QuickTime Player. As an audio source, the program only accepts a microphone and line input. The value of the Soundflower extension is that it can “pretend” to be the microphone that QuickTime sees!

In the main program menu, select the command FileNew screen recording (or press ⌃⌘N). In the pop-up QuickTime Player window, click on the small arrow to the right of the record button, and in the menu Microphone select item Soundflower (2ch). That's it, you can start recording - all the sound that different programs will make at this time, QuickTime Player will fix. :)

Schematically, the whole process can be represented as such a simple infographic:

In the first part - the standard process of recording a screencast through QuickTime Player: during recording, we hear sound, in the final file - silence. Then we install Soundflower - and during the recording we don’t hear anything, but in the final file all the sounds will already be available. Finally, by duplicating the sound stream from Soundflower to Soundflowerbed, we turn on the sound while recording a screencast.

And here's the main question for Apple: was it so difficult to integrate this functionality into QuickTime Player itself? :)

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