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10 curious facts about the family of the British monarch, which not everyone knows

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If you decide to write a letter or send a postcard to members of the British Royal Family, then you will need the following information.

There is no strict protocol on how to compose a letter in an appeal to members of the Royal Family, but some want to abide by traditions. In this case, the Queen should be addressed to 'Madam' and end the word with the phrase 'I have the honor to be, Madam, Your Majesty's humble and obedient servant' (I am proud to be, Madame, Your Majesty the humble and obedient servant).

The rest of the Royal Family will be approached by the formal beginning of 'Sir' (Sir) or 'Madam'. Some prefer to start the letter with the appeal 'Your Majesty' (Your Majesty) or 'Your Royal Highness' (Your Royal Highness) and end the letter with the signature 'Yours sincerely' (Sincerely yours).

You can send letters to the following addresses:

Her majesty the queen
Buckingham palace
London SW1A 1AA

The duke and duchess of cambridge
Clarence house
London SW1A 1BA
General enquiries can be made by telephone during working hours: (+44) (0) 20 7930 4832.

The duke of edinburgh
Buckingham palace
London SW1A 1AA
Tel (during working hours): (+44) (0) 20 7930 4832

The Prince of Wales and The Duchess of Cornwall
Clarence house
London SW1A 1BA
General enquiries can be made by telephone during working hours: (+44) (0) 20 7930 4832.

The duke and duchess of sussex
Clarence house
London SW1A 1BA
General enquiries can be made by telephone during working hours: (+44) (0) 20 7930 4832.

The duke of york
Buckingham palace
London SW1A 1AA
Tel (during working hours): (+44) (0) 20 7930 4832

The Earl and Countess of Wessex
Bagshot park
Bagshot
Surrey GU19 5PL
Tel (during working hours): (+44) (0) 20 7930 4832

The princess royal
Buckingham palace
London SW1A 1AA
Tel (during working hours): (+44) (0) 20 7930 4832

The duke and duchess of gloucester
Kensington palace
London W8 4PU
Tel (during working hours): (+44) (0) 20 7930 4832

The Duke and Duchess of Kent
St james's palace
London SW1A 1BQ
Tel (during working hours): (+44) (0) 20 7930 4832

Princess alexandra
Buckingham palace
London SW1A 1AA
Tel (during working hours): (+44) (0) 20 7930 4832

10. How many members are there in the British royal family?

In the literal sense of the word, 15 people belong to the royal family.

Appropriate titles are: Elizabeth II and her husband Philip, their children (Charles, Anna, Andrew, Edward), their grandchildren (William, Harry, Beatrice, Eugene, James, Louise), great-grandchildren (Prince George and Princess Charlotte), as well Queen's sister Margaret.

In addition, another 15 people are directly related to the queen, although they do not hold titles and do not claim the throne. These are the dukes, counts, lords and ladies.

9. How is the queen's day?

The Queen gets up at 7:30 in the morning. At this time, she is served tea without sugar and cookies "Mary" with milk. Since the gastronomic tastes of the royal people are not widely advertised, it is impossible to say exactly which kind of tea Elizabeth loves: some sources claim that this is Earl Gray, others - that the English Breakfast.

At 8:30, Elizabeth has breakfast with her husband, the Duke of Edinburgh, in the dining room overlooking the garden of Buckingham Palace. On the table are usually corn flakes, yogurt and toasts with maple syrup or marmalade. The Queen reads newspapers at breakfast, most often the Daily Telegraph and the Racing Post.

After the morning meal, the Queen holds briefings on various issues with her assistants. It also discusses the mail that Elizabeth looks through in person — about 200-300 letters a day. Until late in the evening, the Queen is busy with official meetings and events.

And even before bedtime, Elizabeth deals exclusively with matters of national importance: she reads all the documents with the main topics of the day, which are delivered to her daily in a special red box.

8. Favorite decoration of Elizabeth II

A pearl necklace of three threads almost always adorns the queen's neck - this is a visiting card of her style. When Elizabeth was 10 years old, she received such a necklace as a gift from her grandfather George V, and it became her favorite jewelry.

A little later, Queen Mary, Elizabeth's grandmother, gave her pearl earrings. And to this day, they, together with a necklace, form part of the image of a modern monarch.

7. The tradition of changing the name when ascending to the throne

Since ancient times, the monarchs of different countries took at the time of their power in power a throne name, different from what was given to them at birth. In Britain, this tradition was also maintained. So, Queen Victoria before the coronation was Princess Alexandrina, and King George was named Albert. Elizabeth II chose not to change the name, because this is only a permissible, but not mandatory thing for the monarch.

Of course, many connoisseurs of traditions still remember the queen of her choice. In 2002, on the eve of the 50th anniversary of Elizabeth’s ascension to the throne, several letters were sent to the Queen on behalf of veterans of the nationalist Scottish National Party. In the letters it was said that it was time for the queen to accept the throne name. But, as we see many years later, Elizabeth II is firm in her decision.

Official appeal to members of the British royal family and aristocrats

  1. 1 Respect the representative of the royal family with a bow to the head (not a bow to the waist) if you are a man and a small curtsy (you need to put your right foot behind your left heel and bend your knees slightly) if you are a woman. Bowing or curtsy is optional if you are not a citizen of the United Kingdom or the Commonwealth, and even so, these traditional gestures are not necessary at this time. However, in any case, this is an acceptable courtesy.
    • Just shake the queen's hand if she holds it out to you. If you wear gloves, do not remove them.
    • Do not start a conversation with the queen first. Instead, wait for her to contact you.
  2. 2 Complete your first answer to a member of the royal family using an official appeal. For example, if the prince asks you: Do you like the UK? ", You need to answer:" She is beautiful, Your Royal Highness. "Each title involves its own special appeal:

  • Kings and queens are addressed by "Your Majesty." Present them to others as "Her Royal Majesty" (not “Queen of England” as she is “Queen of the United Kingdom”, “Queen of Canada” and many more other titles).
  • For princes and princesses, contact "Your Royal Highness." Think of them as "His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales." Any child or grandson / granddaughter male line is a prince or princess. The spouse of the prince is also a princess, although she is not always "Princess" Her First Name. The spouse of a princess is not always a prince. The great-grandchildren of the male monarch are not princes or princesses. They should be referred to as “lord” or “lady”, for example, “Lady Jane” and be represented as “Lady Jane Windsor” (unless they have their own titles).
  • The Dukes and Duchesses are referred to as "Your Grace" or "Duke / Duchess". The Duke should be introduced as "His Grace the Earl of Norfolk," the Duchess as "Her Grace the Duchess of Norfolk."
  • Baronets and knights, men, are addressed by "Sir Brian" (if his name is Brian Twits), and by his wife, "Lady Twights." You need to introduce him using the full name, "Sir Brian Twits," and the wife, "Lady Twits."
  • Cavalier ladies (the equivalent of chivalry for women - for the title of baronet there is no equivalent) - "Lady Gertrude" in circulation, and she must be represented by "Lady Gertrude Mellon".
  • Other titles (including Marquises / Marquis, Counts / Countess, Viscounts / Viscountess, Baronov / Baroness) are usually referred to as "Lord or Lady Trowbridge" (for Earl Trowbridge), and must be represented using the appropriate title as "Viscount Sweet" or " Baroness Rivendell. "
  • 3 Subsequently, use the references "Sir" or "Madame" ("Ma" am "). If the titled person communicates in an informal manner, you can omit the appeal “Sir” or “Madame”. Do not make them ask for it.
    • The order of priority of the British royal family and the aristocracy is as follows (from highest to lowest):

    • King / queen
    • Prince / princess
    • Duke / Duchess
    • Marquise / Marquise
    • Count / Countess
    • Viscount / Viscountess
    • Baron / Baroness
    • Baronet
    • Knight / Cavalry Lady
  • Usually you do not need to give the exact peer title when you present it. You can introduce the peer’s wife to “Lady Trowbridge” (and not “Lady Honoria Trowbridge,” which will mean that she still has titles inherited from her).
  • If someone tells you how he / she would like to be contacted, you can forget about the basic rules.
  • This is especially true for higher titles, as often their surname is different from the title. In such cases, never reproduce this option: “Title Surname” (although the son or daughter of a peer may have the title Lord / Lady Surname).
  • You can find a more complete list by driving “contact forms” into the search bar.
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